Oregon: “Summer Playground of the Northwest”

Oregon has long been a popular destination for those seeking warm-weather recreation. With seemingly endless options set amid a landscape abundant in natural beauty, Oregon is a big draw for visitors from out of state in search of vacation fun and for Oregonians seeking a weekend (or week-long) escape from the day-to-day. As is evident from this article from the June 28, 1914, issue of the Sunday Oregonian, there is no shortage of “Vacation Haunts in Oregon.”

The Sunday Oregonian is the Sunday edition of the long-running Oregonian newspaper, which is the oldest continuously running newspaper on the West Coast and has been a major newspaper in Portland, Oregon, since 1850. First published on December 4, 1881, the Sunday Oregonian has striven to print news of interest to those in Multnomah County, Oregon, and far beyond. Such news of interest includes what to do, and where to sojourn, in Oregon in the summertime. The aforementioned “Vacation Haunts in Oregon” article published in the Sunday Oregonian suggests a plethora of options for summer vacation in the state, from “an outing on the beach,” to “boating or canoeing,” to “trout fishing,” to “running about through mountains and forest,” to “camp[ing] or liv[ing] in rented tent houses or small seaside cottages.”

Speaking of seaside cottages…

Another article, published in the July 4, 1920, edition of the Sunday Oregonian, points the way to summertime destinations (and doings) in Seaside, Oregon, a historic summer resort area and longtime beach vacation destination. The article, titled “News of the Resorts,” extensively reports on the Oregon families who were summering in beach cottages along the shore. Reporting on the Yost family, the article says:

“Idlewild” Cottage is being occupied this year by Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Yost, their parents and three children. The family were formerly from Portland, but have recently made their home in Vancouver. They have been at the coast two weeks.”

Also according to “News of the Resorts”:

The garden at Necanicum this year is just as beautiful as ever and can be enjoyed to the fullest extent from the sun parlor built last year. The hotel, which is in its twentieth year under Mrs. Damon’s management, is opening this season with Mrs. M. W. Cruise of Oregon Agricultural college in charge of the dining room. She has with her several co-eds from the domestic science department assisting.

“News of the Resorts” goes on to chronicle the opening of summer homes in Gearhart, Oregon; who’s who among the visitors inhabiting the cottages in Cannon Beach, Oregon; seasonal travelers to the seaside resort destination of Newport Beach, Oregon; as well as Fourth of July festivities, parties, and the opening of a new public restroom in Long Beach, Washington, thanks to the efforts of the Ladies’ Aid Society of Long Beach.

In addition, the “News of the Resorts” article features a photograph of Crescent Lake, a natural lake and recreational spot that has long been popular with those who enjoy fishing, swimming and sailing:

With such natural, picturesque attractions like Crescent Lake that invite all manner of outdoor warm-weather fun, summer in Oregon has a strong, undeniable lure that can be felt near and far. As the “Vacation Haunts in Oregon” article states:

All nature in Oregon invites the vacationist. That’s why Oregon is called “The Summer playground of the Northwest” and that also is the reason this state is drawing annually bigger crowds of tourists and vacationists from the East. The outing places are all here and they’re free. They lack artificiality and formality, holding still their original natural beauty and attractiveness.

So, in the words of the “Vacation Haunts in Oregon” piece, “now for your summer vacation. Dig out your fishing tackle, your big shoes, the old duck suit, your bathing trunks and the slouch hat and hit the trail. Nature, you will find, has had your comfort and pleasure in mind since last Summer and will be on hand as usual to greet you with big broad smiles whichever way you turn.” Happy summer (and enjoy the sun)!

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ODNP Blog Has Moved!

Thank you for visiting the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program blog! Our site has moved – please visit us at http://odnp.uoregon.edu for project information and updates, as well as newly re-vamped K-12 lesson plans geared toward using historic newspapers in the classroom to meet common core standards.

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Issues of the Crook County Journal Now Online, 1901-1921!

Thanks to a partnership with the Crook County Historical Society/Bowman Museum in Prineville, Oregon, issues of the Crook County Journal are now available online at Historic Oregon Newspapers!

The Crook County Journal reliably kept residents of Prineville, Oregon, informed for more than two decades, beginning in the 1890s. Throughout its run, the newspaper was published weekly, arriving hot off the press every Thursday. In 1901, readers could get the Crook County Journal for $1.50 for a one-year subscription, 75 cents for a six-month subscription, and 50 cents for a three-month subscription. At the end of the newspaper’s run, in 1921, subscriptions were only offered on an annual basis, for $2 a year.

For the first decade of the 20th century, readers of the Crook County Journal were treated to four pages of content. In later decades, the newspaper averaged eight pages. Topics covered included local and state news, especially politics and natural disasters, school happenings and construction projects. Advertisements, which increasingly took up more page space with each passing year of the newspaper’s existence, touted a range of products and services, from typewriters to farming equipment to menswear to banking services.

Content from the Crook County Journal can be browsed online at the Historic Oregon Newspapers website. Each issue of the newspaper can be browsed by issue date via the website’s calendar view. In addition, specific content can be found through keyword search on the website’s search page. PDFs of newspaper pages can be downloaded. All issues of the Crook County Journal that are now online are available for browsing, searches, and downloads – all for FREE at Historic Oregon Newspapers!

Historic Oregon Newspapers now has weekly coverage of the Crook County Journal from January 2, 1901, through July 7, 1921. Take a look at this and other historic newspaper content from Oregon at Historic Oregon Newspapers!

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Chronicling America, Historic Oregon Newspapers Now with New Content!

Calling all aficionados of historic Oregon newspapers! The Chronicling America and Historic Oregon Newspaper websites have been updated with lots of great new content. All issues of historic Oregon newspapers that have been added to these sites are completely free to search and are easily keyword searchable.

New content includes the following:

Chronicling America is a website that provides “access to information about historic newspapers and select digitized newspaper pages, and is produced by the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).” Historic Oregon Newspapers is a website that lets you “search and access complete content for historic Oregon newspapers that have been digitized as part of the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program (ODNP).” ODNP is a program of the University of Oregon Libraries with the help of major grants and external funding.

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Historic Oregon Newspapers Online: Available and Forthcoming Titles

The Oregon Digital Newspaper Program strives to continually add more content to Historic Oregon Newspapers online. To view a list of Oregon titles that are currently available for searching and browsing online, as well as a list of forthcoming titles, please visit our informational Title Selection page.

The left column, “NDNP Titles,” lists all Oregon newspapers that have been digitized through the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, in partnership with the Library of Congress. These titles are available both on Historic Oregon Newspapers online and Chronicling America, a nationwide historic newspaper database hosted by the Library of Congress. Forthcoming titles will be made available online as soon as possible. Stay tuned to our blog for announcements of newly added content and other project updates and highlights.

The right column, “Oregon-Only Titles,” lists all Oregon newspapers that are available on Historic Oregon Newspapers online, with funding from various grants, donations, and partnerships with public libraries, historical societies, and other heritage groups across the state.

Happy Searching!

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Warm Springs’ Spilyay Tymoo now online, 1986-2005!

Spilyay Tymoo, the current newspaper of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, is now available from 1986-2005 on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website, thanks to a partnership with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, with funding from University of Oregon Libraries donors. The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, located in Central Oregon, is a federally recognized Indian Tribe made up of Warm Springs, Wasco, and Paiute Tribes.

Masthead from the Spilyay Tymoo shows an illustration of a desert mountain scene with a coyote howling.

Spilyay tymoo. (Warm Springs, Or.) May 23, 1986, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050507/1986-05-23/ed-1/seq-1/

The Spilyay Tymoo has been in publication since 1976, and continues on a bi-weekly schedule today. While the University of Oregon Libraries has the earliest issues of the paper available in Special Collections, only the issues published between 1986 and 2005 have been microfilmed, and were thus the first to be scanned and made available online. This 19 year span of local, regional, and national Native American news can be keyword searched, via the Historic Oregon Newspapers’ Search page, and the paper’s Calendar View makes it easy to browse issues by date.

Photograph of two men in a boat on a river. Caption reads: "Gathering data chilly job. Warm Springs tribal biologist Mark Fritsch and John Ogan from the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife brave the cold while they collect data. By taking an inventory of native fall chinook carcasses tagged earlier in the year at Sherar's Falls, biologists are able to make population estimates.

Spilyay tymoo. (Warm Springs, Or.) December 29, 1989, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050507/1989-12-29/ed-1/seq-1/

The most recent issues of the Spilyay Tymoo can be viewed on the Warm Springs News website, and more information can be found on the Spilyay Tymoo Facebook page.

Clipping shows a photograph of several people sitting inside a longhouse structure, with test that reads: "Celilo Village welcomes new longhouse"

Spilyay tymoo. (Warm Springs, Or.) August 04, 2005, Image 11. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050507/2005-08-04/ed-1/seq-11/

Content from the Spilyay Tymoo, and all newspaper content on Historic Oregon Newspapers that was published after 1922 is available online through a Creative Commons, Attribution-Non Commercial 3.0 license. Many thanks to the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, for partnering with the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program to make the Spilyay Tymoo available to the public online!

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Smoke Signals and Chemawa American Now Available at Historic Oregon Newspapers Online!

Thanks to collaborations with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and funding from University of Oregon (UO) Libraries donors, three new important titles are now available for searching and browsing on Historic Oregon Newspapers online:

Smoke Signals masthead features the title, Smoke Signals, in bold, followed by text that reads: "A publication of the Grand Ronde Tribe, www.grandronde.org. Umpqua, Molalla, Rogue River, Kalapuya, Chasta

Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) July 15, 2013, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050714/2013-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

Weekly Chemawa American masthead

Weekly Chemawa American. (Chemawa, Or.) December 30, 1910, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/ca15001324/1910-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

The Chemawa American masthead

The Chemawa American. (Chemawa, Or.) April 01, 1915, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/2003238611/1915-04-01/ed-1/seq-1/

This content is now available online in addition to the Klamath Tribune, which was published from 1956-1961 and documents the termination of the Klamath Tribes. (See our blog post from last spring for more information on the Klamath Tribune.)

Smoke Signals, the current newspaper of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, is now available for searching and browsing online with issues dating from 1978-2013. Smoke Signals started off as a monthly tribal newsletter in the 1970s as the Tribes were organizing to restore their tribal status, which had been terminated by the federal government in 1954. The U.S. Congress passed the Grand Ronde Restoration Act in 1983, restoring federally recognized status to the Tribes.

Clipping reads: "Grand Ronde's Restored! They say it was the strongest Restoration Bill ever presented to Congress! WIth fifty-seven letters of support and no opposition, our Bill was passed in the House on November 7, 1983, sponsored by Congressman Les AuCoin, D-Ore. 'This is a day of celebration,' said Rep. Les AuCoin, 'The Grand Ronde are a determined people who have earned the dignity of being called a Tribe once more.' On Nov. 11, 1983, Senator Hatfield presented it to the Senate where it passed without going through Committee. THis was a unique situation and was an important factor in its swift passage in the Senate. With this accomplished in both the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate; both of our Congressmen then pushed for the signing by the President; he signed it on Nov. 22, 1983, making our restoration Bill, H.R. 3885 (Union Calendar No. 276) into LAW! We are, and will ever be, grateful to Congressman AuCoin for introducing our Bill, Sept. 14, 1983; and, for his support and able-assistance throughout this entire legislation. Also, we are thankful to Senator Hatfield for his interest and staunch support which was the factor in the Senate's passage too. We are now looking forward to working with them, especially Congressman AuCoin, during the next two years on our Reservation Plan. We are now planning to have a Restoration celebration tentatively, sometime during the early part of 1984. We will have a notice in the newsletter when all plans are finalized. -Kathryn Harrison, Community Org."

Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) November 01, 1983, Image 3. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050714/1983-11-01/ed-1/seq-3/

In 1995, the paper started appearing twice a month, and in 2005, Smoke Signals became part of the Tribes’ Public Affairs Department. During its lifetime and through numerous staff changes, Smoke Signals has won many journalism awards from the Native American Journalists Association and Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Clipping shows an image of two children in traditional regalia, dancing inside a gymnasium. Clipping reads: "Tribe Celebrates Restoration. Members unite to give thanks, recognize effort and achievements. Celebration - Tribal members Melissa Biery (left) and Shasta Wilson fancy shawl dance for an admiring crowd at the Annual Grand Ronde Restoration Day Pow-Wow, held in the new gymnasium at the Tribe's Education campus."

Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) December 01, 2002, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050714/2002-12-01/ed-1/seq-1/

The majority of issues from Smoke Signals were scanned from microfilm negatives at the University of Oregon (UO) Libraries, but the Tribe scanned and provided several early issues that were missing from the UO Libraries’ microfilm collection.

The Weekly Chemawa American, available online from 1901-1910, featured news articles, literature, and photographs by students who were attending a journalism class taught by staff of the Chemawa Indian Boarding School. The paper covered school news, student achievements, and events, and reported on interesting articles and topics found in various newspapers, such as the Oregonian, in addition to student editorials. By late 1914, the publication shifted to a monthly schedule, dropping “weekly” from the title to become The Chemawa American, now available online from 1914-1915.

Clipping from the Chemawa American reads: "Oregon Rural Schools: our system attracting attention everywhere. That the people living in rural districts of Oregon care more for their schools, are working harder to give their boys and girls a practical education, and have made a greater advance than any other state, is clearly proved by the reception which has been given the rural school  exhibit at the Panama Pacific International Exposition."

The Chemawa American. (Chemawa, Or.) December 01, 1915, Image 10. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/2003238611/1915-12-01/ed-1/seq-10/

Chemawa Indian Boarding School is the oldest continually operating Indian Boarding School in the United States, established in 1880 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Forest Grove, Oregon, and then moved to Salem in 1885. The school has hosted students from throughout the western United States, including special groups of Alaskan natives, Navajo Indians, and in the earliest years, primarily students from Oregon’s tribal reservations. The school is still in operation today under management by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Image from the Weekly Chemawa American shows a fence and gate with a sign that says "Indian Training School" surrounding a yard with two trees and a building in the distance. Children are standing around the scene, with one child on a bicycle. Image is on the front page of Vol. 6 issue 8, dated November 14, 1902. Caption reads "Main school entrance."

Weekly Chemawa American. (Chemawa, Or.) November 14, 1902, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/ca15001324/1902-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

All issues of the weekly and monthly Chemawa American were carefully scanned from the original paper documents, borrowed from the Cultural Exhibits and Archives program of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, where they are housed as part of the Charles Holmes collection. Charles Holmes was a teacher and the student newspaper advisor at the Chemawa Indian School from the 1950s – 1970s, and the collection includes thousands of photographs, correspondence, media, and other documents. Students at Willamette University have been working to catalogue and archive the many photographs from the Chemawa Indian School that are part of the Charles Holmes collection, led by archaeology professor Rebecca Dobkins in collaboration with the Tribes (read more about this project at http://www.grandronde.org/news/articles/dobkins-tells-chemawa-indian-school-stories-at-salem-library/).

Image shows a student with a yearbook and laptop, working at a desk. Caption reads: "Emilie Jensen, a senior at Willamette University in Salem, looks through a Chemawa Indian School yearbook from 1961 as she works on an assignment for her Native North American Cultures class in the college's archives on Thurs. Nov. 15. The yearbook is part of a collection that Chemawa industrial arts teacher and yearbook and newspaper advisor Charles Holmes had. The collection was donated to the Tribes after he walked on in 2011.

Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) December 01, 2012, Image 5. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93050714/2012-12-01/ed-1/seq-5/

Special thanks to the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, as well as Jennifer O’Neal, University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon Libraries, and David Lewis (CTGR Tribal Historian), for facilitating this significant digitization project!

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